insight therapy

insight therapy

[′in‚sīt ‚ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
Treatment of a personality disorder by attempting to uncover the deep causes of the individual's problem and to help eliminate defense mechanisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other types of therapy, such as insight therapy or psychodynamic therapy, focus on exploring the patient's beliefs, emotions, and past experiences, often from his or her childhood, in order to help the patient access his or her unconscious feelings and thoughts.
Stokes claims that the process is faster and more efficient when insight therapy is combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy.
The purposes of this article are to describe the factors that increase the risk of depression in black women who are family caregivers of persons receiving chronic hemodialysis therapy and to describe INSIGHT therapy, a cognitive behavioral group therapy approach, as a potential intervention that prevents and reduces depressive symptoms in this understudied population.
Culturally relevant interventions like INSIGHT Therapy are needed because black caregivers are less likely to seek traditional professional support to manage depressive symptoms.
INSIGHT therapy is a short-term group approach which has been designed to prevent and reduce depression in women.
INSIGHT therapy is a cognitive-behavioral approach designed to treat and prevent depressive symptoms in women and is based on Beck's (1978) cognitive, Seligman's (1975) learned helplessness, and Lewinsohn's behavioral models of depression (Lewinsohn, Sullivan, & Grosscupp, 1982).
INSIGHT therapy incorporates positive affirmations or positive "self-talk" and teaches effective ways to challenge distorted thinking, both of which reduce depressive symptoms like hopelessness and anxiety while enhancing self-esteem.
Cognitive-behavioral interventions like INSIGHT therapy have demonstrated efficacy in chronically, medically ill black females; participants have high attendance rates and report high satisfaction with this approach when barriers to attendance are eliminated (D'Eramo-Melkus et al.
The authors of this article have received funding from the National Institute of Nursing, National Institutes of Health to determine the degree to which INSIGHT therapy reduces depression and anxiety symptoms and hopelessness, and improves the self-esteem and functioning of black women who are caregivers.
While INSIGHT therapy is not specific to the caregiver role, the depressive symptoms that these women experience are likely the result of competing life stressors that challenge their coping and impair their self-esteem.