dietary fiber

(redirected from Insoluble fiber)
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dietary fiber

[¦dī·ə‚ter·ē ′fī·bər]
(food engineering)
The plant-cell-wall polysaccharides and lignin in a food or food ingredient that are not broken down by the digestive enzymes of animals and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to those results, the most external layers of the culm possess the higher insoluble fiber content and this concentration increases from the internal to the external layers.
BarnDad's Ultra Fiber DX product has no sugar, contains both soluble and insoluble fiber, and provides 11 grams of fiber per serving, Halbrock says.
It's important that dogs drink enough water when taking fiber supplements (especially insoluble fiber); add water to food if needed.
Insoluble fiber mainly eases the passage of foods through the digestive system and cleanses intestinal walls, whereas soluble fiber promotes actual changes in intestinal pH.
Although all fruits, vegetables, and grains have both soluble and insoluble fiber, most grains, like wheat, are richer in insoluble fiber, which is not broken down by digestive enzymes or by bacteria in the gut.
Insoluble fiber contains cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin and cannot be dissolved in water, unlike soluble fiber.
In another fiber study, obese, nondiabetic women increased their insulin sensitivity by an average of 8 percent in just three days by eating about 10 grams of pure insoluble fiber from fiber enriched bread three times daily.
Eating a diet high in insoluble fiber might be a safe, effective, and low-cost way to reduce insulin resistance in patients at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, said Dr.
Nutriose[R], a water-soluble fiber ingredient, is an excellent complement to National Starch's Hi-maize[R] resistant starch insoluble fiber. Nutriose[R] is ideally suited for high-moisture applications, such as beverage and dairy, and fits with National Starch Food Innovation's focus on nutritional ingredients for digestive health and energy management.
They were divided into quintiles for each of five measurements of carbohydrate quality: Glycemic index (the degree to which an average gram of carbohydrate increases blood glucose, compared with white bread); glycemic load (a measure of both glycemic index and carbohydrate quantity); total fiber consumed; insoluble fiber intake; and soluble fiber intake.
The fiber in pears is divided almost equally between soluble fiber, predominantly pectin, and insoluble fiber. "A key point is that the fiber is found in the skin, so we do encourage people to keep the skin on their pears and not peel them," Wieking says.