inspector

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inspector

a police officer ranking below a superintendent or chief inspector and above a sergeant
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inspector

 

(1) An official in Soviet state institutions, enterprises, and many public organizations in charge of supervision and control over subordinate agencies and persons—for example, finance, school, and sanitation inspectors.

(2) In pre-revolutionary men’s secondary schools, a director’s assistant in charge of studies and discipline—for example, inspectors of classical and commercial secondary schools.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inspector

[in′spek·tər]
(mining engineering)
One employed to make examinations of and to report upon mines and surface plants relative to compliance with mining laws, rules and regulations, and safety methods.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

inspector

McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our data suggests, however, that all three inspectors in Saskatchewan and Inspector Brasset in Alberta never inspected bilingual schools, and that the seven remaining inspectors occasionally visited only those bilingual schools located within their regular inspectorial boundaries (Burelle, 1984; Huel, 1983b; Lapointe & Tessier, 198 6, p.
In the ensuing years, she and others who studied with Jaques-Dalcroze were active in educational and inspectorial positions, and generated a wave of change.
Lancaster, FAIA, announced the Department's inspectorial staff and field responders will now wear newly-issued uniforms.
In Sydney, they called on William Clements, a veterinary surgeon, to examine sheep (at 6d per head) but he was not allowed to interfere with the coastal trade, whatever the origin of the sheep or ship.(73) Part of the problem arose out of the dislike felt by sheep owners for inspectorial powers when used against themselves; the 1858 committee heard so many outraged protests that it had to conclude that the appointment of Inspectors in the Country Districts has not been found to work satisfactorily'.(74) This reinforced the suspicion that quarantine and acaricides would not work but the basic problem was reluctance to commit the funds necessary to effective controls.