institutional reflexivity

institutional reflexivity

the regularized use of knowledge about circumstances of social life as a constitutive element in its organization and transformation’ (GIDDENS, 1991). see also REFLEXIVE MODERNIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Accreditation carries the stigma of being an onerous, self-serving process that while encouraging institutional reflexivity seldom generates measurable quality improvement.
It is positively influenced by vivid pro-innovative adaptations in the level of organisations (lower part of Figure 3) and insufficiently supported by institutional reflexivity and interactions among the segments of NIS (middle part of Figure 3).
Let us go over to the second issue--conditions for institutional reflexivity in terms of the above discussed interactive model of NIS.
Beyond his description of the separation of time and space that enables "the use of history to make history" (243) clearly relevant to a film set in the past and aimed at the present, in Modernity and Identity Anthony Giddens describes two key characteristics of modernity central to the film's investigation of subjectivity: 1) capitalism, "a system of commodity production involving both competitive product markets and the commodification of labour power" (15); and 2) institutional reflexivity, "the regularized use of knowledge about circumstances of social life as a constitutive element in its organization and transformation" (21).
The relationship between institutional reflexivity and modern identity established in the film is most apparent in the multiple uses of language.
By arguing that a "lay sociological imagination" (Mesny 1998b) has diffused throughout society, that we live in a "sociological culture" (Merton and Wolfe 1995) and that a "lay sociology" is spreading (Gans 1989), sociologists can take comfort in the fact that, although the process is uncontrollable and hardly researchable, sociology goes public on a continuous and pervasive basis, and contributes an important part to society's institutional reflexivity (Giddens 1990).
Given the role of clinical literature in the shaping of the experience of mental disorders, we should be talking here about institutional reflexivity, but we must continue in our quest for the sources of this modern reflexivity.
Institutional reflexivity occurs when members collectively question the prevailing paradigm or theory of effectiveness and then collectively recognize when transformational change is required.
Consequently, the natural sciences are becoming part of our daily life in various new ways, and they are increasingly part of institutional reflexivity as much as the social sciences are.
His study of "John Darrell and the Politics of Exorcism in late Elizabethan England," I would argue, shows that institutional reflexivity operates, in practice, as a recursive process.
An open conversation is one in which the conversation itself creates the conditions for conversing - that is, it is an image which expresses the institutional reflexivity that characterizes the production and re-production of society in time.
In terms of Giddens' recent analyses, the phenomenon of institutional reflexivity seems to fit this case.
Encyclopedia browser ?
Full browser ?