instrument approach chart


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instrument approach chart

[′in·strə·mənt ə¦prōch ‚chärt]
(navigation)
An aeronautical chart designed for use under instrument flight conditions, for making instrument approach and letdown to contact flight conditions in the vicinity of an aerodrome.

instrument approach chart

instrument approach chartclick for a larger image
instrument approach chartclick for a larger image
An aeronautical chart that depicts the aeronautical data required to execute an instrument approach procedure to an airport. These charts depict the procedures, including all related data, and the airport diagram. Each procedure is designated for use with a specific type of electronic navigation system, including NDB (nondirectional beacon), TACAN (tactical air navigation), VOR (very high frequency omnidirectional radio-range), ILS/MLS (instrument landing system/microwave landing system), and RNAV (area navigation). These charts are identified by the type of NAVAID (navigational aids) providing the final approach guidance. The chart in the illustration is for the Dubai airfield and describes the procedure for Cat II ILS. The illustration on the left gives the general layout for these charts. Also referred to as instrument approach and landing charts or approach plates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Third, and if history is a guide, the hardest item to remember, without glideslope information very often the MAP is identified by a cross-bearing from a second VOR (or, egad, an NDB), or even less accurately, merely by timing from the FAF inbound using your best estimate of your groundspeed and the time-to-MAP tables on the instrument approach chart.
Look for the note on the instrument approach chart, but also check Notams because of the temporary nature of these approach limitations.
Because there are several "flavors" of GPS approach (WAAS, non-WAAS, etc.), Rip van Winkle might struggle with finding the correct approach minimums on an instrument approach chart. Many current RNAV approaches list several different sets of minimums, including circling minimums, and an "LNAV MDA," as if you were using GPS in lieu of a localizer on a non-precision approach.
I reviewed the instrument approach chart to confirm the proximity of terrain, noting the non-standard instrument departure procedures (indicated by the T-in-triangle symbol at the upper left of the chart).