instrument weather

instrument weather

[′in·strə·mənt ‚weth·ər]
(meteorology)
Route or terminal weather conditions of sufficiently low visibility to require the operation of aircraft under instrument flight rules (IFR). Also known as IFR weather.
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Much of the flying was in the southeastern United States and in actual instrument weather. At my home airport, if I flew an approach, it turned into a missed approach about one-third of the time.
was caused by the pilot's decision to undertake a flight in which the likelihood of encountering instrument conditions existed, in the mistaken belief that he could cope with en route instrument weather conditions, without having the necessary familiarization with the instruments in the aircraft and without being properly certificated to fly solely by instruments" (emphasis added).
You're in VMC right now, but there's instrument weather down the road to your destination.
Obviously the feds intended actual instrument weather, meaning conditions less than VMC.
One instructor pointed out that the FAA would not give check rides in actual instrument weather and reiterated that there was no requirement in the FARs to get any time in the clag, so why should he give dual in IMC?
While this might seem like relatively benign instrument weather for flatlanders, it is anything but in the Rockies--especially when there's turbulence at the ridges.

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