instrument

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instrument

1. Music any of various contrivances or mechanisms that can be played to produce musical tones or sounds
2. a measuring device, such as a pressure gauge or ammeter
3. 
a. a device or system for use in navigation or control, esp of aircraft
b. (as modifier): instrument landing
4. a formal legal document

Instrument

 

a tool of human labor or an actuating mechanism of a machine, which “takes hold of an object of labor and alters it in an expedient fashion” (K. Marx, in K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 23, p. 384).

Instruments are divided into the following categories: (1) cutting (cutter, drill, broach, milling cutter), (2) pressing (stamp, knurl), (3) polishing (polishing wheel, whetstone), (4) percussion (hammer, chisel, punch), and (5) fastening-clamping (machine tool chuck, cutter tool post, vise, tongs). Various devices, apparatus, and equipment used in science and technology for measurements and other procedures and in medicine and veterinary science for surgical operations, therapeutic procedures, and research are also called instruments.

instrument

[′in·strə·mənt]
(engineering)
A device for measuring and sometimes also recording and controlling the value of a quantity under observation.

instrument

A device using an internal mechanism to show visually or aurally the attitude, altitude, or operation of an aircraft or an aircraft part. It includes electronic devices for automatically controlling an aircraft in flight.

instrument

(programming)
To install devices or instructions into hardware or software to monitor the operation of a system or component.
References in periodicals archive ?
Terminal values such as justice, health, and satisfaction require series of instrumental values such as efficiency, quality, availability, and effectiveness.
Because the intrinsic and instrumental values of free speech apply equally to adolescents and adults and because adolescents appear to share the cognitive capacity of adults, the state should only be able to restrict adolescent speech if it can make a persuasive showing of actual harm unique to adolescents.
Instrumental values, on the other hand, describe desirable modes of conduct, for example, behaving in a manner that is honest, capable, or loving.
Null Hypothesis 2: There are no significant generational differences in instrumental values between managers and non-managers.
The instrumental values are the modes of conduct expected from individuals and can be categorized in two groups: moral and competence.
TABLE 3 Mean Rankings of Instrumental Values by Gang and Nongang Members Mean Gang Members Nongang Members Rank 1 Honest Honest 2 Independent Ambitious 3 Ambitious Loving 4 Responsible Responsible 5 Helpful Courageous 6 Clean Capable 7 Self-controlled Forgiving 8 Polite Polite 9 Loving Self-controlled 10 Forgiving Broadminded 11 Broadminded Helpful 12 Intellectual Intellectual 13 Courageous Obedient 14 Obedient Cheerful 15 Capable Independent 16 Cheerful Clean 17 Imaginative Imaginative 18 Logical Logical Note.
Content and construct validity were performed for both the instrumental and terminal portions of the test, though this was difficult since instrumental values do not fit neatly into terminal values and vice versa.
Agreeableness also explained Instrumental values (pay, benefits, and security concern) more strongly in public sector hospitals than in trust-governed hospitals.
Instrumental values may be the outcome of a particular reading of the "facts" of history, but given that the facts never speak for themselves, the rival positions often appear in the guise of irresolvable values.
The entirety of the physical world with its many diverse constituents is valuable to God, their purposeful creator and sustainer in existence, who endowed humans with the intellectual capacity to discern the intrinsic and instrumental values of the physical world, to behold these values, and to demonstrate these valuations throughout their lives.
Because the materialist idea of information as fact is superimposed over the subjective settings of purpose inherent in ordinary library use and practice, the utilitarian and instrumental values important to practitioners and library users becomes theoretically irrelevant.