instrumental

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instrumental,

in the grammar of certain languages (e.g., Russian), the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 referring to means or instrument. The Latin ablativeablative
[Lat.,=carrying off], in Latin grammar, the case used in a number of circumstances, particularly with certain prepositions and in locating place or time. The term is also used in the grammar of some languages (e.g., Sanskrit, Finnish) for a case of separation, e.g.
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 may in some instances be termed instrumental.

instrumental

a piece of music composed for instruments rather than for voices
References in periodicals archive ?
2006) proposed that gender-related friendship preferences are more complex than can be attributed solely to instrumentality and needs for power versus needs for intimacy, explanations that have commonly been offered.
The law states that bribery of foreign officials is illegal, and it defines a foreign official as "any officer or employee of a foreign government or any department, agency, or instrumentality thereof.
The FCPA defines foreign officials as "any officer or employee of a foreign government or any department, agency, or instrumentality thereof.
A federal court in Arizona has agreed with a growing number of jurisdictions that a franchisor is vicariously liable for the actions of its franchisee only if the franchisor exerts control over the very instrumentality that caused the alleged harm.
Relying on previous case law, the court determined that the analysis hinges on "the instrumentality used to cause the injury" and that "the vehicle must be more than merely incidental to the injury-it must be the instrumentality which caused the injury.
In the case of museums and memories, the instrumentality of past transport continues to resonate: past transport activity that enabled other activity is restaged (actually or imaginatively for the observer by the curator) in the present to serve some other purpose, be it technical, artistic or social.
More than seven years in the making, the issue first came to light in 2004 when the IRS issued a private letter ruling that stated that a FCU was not an eligible employer under Section 457 of the IRC because it was a federal government instrumentality.
An important question that arises from these studies, however, is whether the motivation that students derive from these instrumentality beliefs is actually adaptive.
Two tests have emerged for determining whether or not an entity is an "agency or instrumentality," which the FSIA vaguely defines as a "separate legal person.
To study how people weigh information when judging their own and others' masculinity-femininity (M-F), the author asked 170 male and 205 female participants to rate themselves and their best friends on M-F, instrumentality, expressiveness, and gender-typed hobby preferences.