instrument

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instrument

1. Music any of various contrivances or mechanisms that can be played to produce musical tones or sounds
2. a measuring device, such as a pressure gauge or ammeter
3. 
a. a device or system for use in navigation or control, esp of aircraft
b. (as modifier): instrument landing
4. a formal legal document

Instrument

 

a tool of human labor or an actuating mechanism of a machine, which “takes hold of an object of labor and alters it in an expedient fashion” (K. Marx, in K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 23, p. 384).

Instruments are divided into the following categories: (1) cutting (cutter, drill, broach, milling cutter), (2) pressing (stamp, knurl), (3) polishing (polishing wheel, whetstone), (4) percussion (hammer, chisel, punch), and (5) fastening-clamping (machine tool chuck, cutter tool post, vise, tongs). Various devices, apparatus, and equipment used in science and technology for measurements and other procedures and in medicine and veterinary science for surgical operations, therapeutic procedures, and research are also called instruments.

instrument

[′in·strə·mənt]
(engineering)
A device for measuring and sometimes also recording and controlling the value of a quantity under observation.

instrument

A device using an internal mechanism to show visually or aurally the attitude, altitude, or operation of an aircraft or an aircraft part. It includes electronic devices for automatically controlling an aircraft in flight.

instrument

(programming)
To install devices or instructions into hardware or software to monitor the operation of a system or component.
References in periodicals archive ?
Polymers and other organic materials are typically much more compliant compared to the metallic and ceramic types of materials to which instrumented indentation mainly has been applied, with modulus values ranging from a few GPa for common glassy polymers to a few MPa or lower for rubbery polymers and many biological materials.
In recent research at NIST, analyses by Ting [61] that are based on contact between a rigid indenter and a linear viscoelastic material were revisited and used to determine under what conditions, if any, instrumented indentation can be used to measure linear viscoelastic behavior for a number of different polymers [58].
The advent of piezoelectric sensors for instrumented impact testers is said to provide greatly increased sensitivity, allowing for testing of very light films, foams, and most other materials used in packaging.
Falling-weight instruments, including the traditional Gardner dart drop and instrumented drop towers, can be used to determine the amount of energy that is needed to cause a failure on a plaque, sheet, film, pipe, profile, or molded product.

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