Coronary Insufficiency

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Coronary Insufficiency

 

(coronary heart disease, ischemic heart disease), a condition in which the amount of blood flowing through the coronary arteries fails to meet the heart’s oxygen demand. Coronary insufficiency is most often a result of atherosclerosis, spasm, and thrombosis of the coronary arteries, and it is manifested in the form of stenocardia, myocar-dial infarction, cardiosclerosis, and cardiac arryhthmias.

References in periodicals archive ?
Based on these two reports, it is believed that the treatment of glottic insufficiency, when present, should improve patients' MTPs, at least hypothetically.
Diagnostic evaluation of suspected cases of adrenal insufficiency is hindered by non-availability of injection Synacthen.
1-3] Two types of SFs have been described according to etiology: fatigue fractures and insufficiency fractures.
8-10) These studies do note, however, that the absolute risk of insufficiency fracture is very low, and that the benefits of bisphosphonate therapy greatly outweigh the risks.
Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a condition characterized by deficiency of the exocrine pancreatic enzymes.
Levels of plasma PAI-1 in placental insufficiency are therefore downstream of competing molecular regulatory mechanisms related to hypoxia.
Due to the inherent porosity of sacral bone and comorbidity of osteoporosis, cement extravasation may be a risk for treatment of sacral insufficiency fractures.
The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency
Results of the endocrinological test and skin hyperpigmentation strongly suggested chronic primary adrenal insufficiency.
However, in elderly women, relatively little is known about the effects of long-term vitamin D insufficiency on bone health.
Insufficiency fractures (IF) occur when normal stresses are applied to bone weakened by osteoporosis.
Doctors at the St Marianna University School of Medicine in Kawasaki, Japan, collected viable eggs from women with a condition called primary ovarian insufficiency.