Insult


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Insult

 

under Soviet criminal law, the intentional lowering of a person’s honor and dignity, expressed in unseemly form. The insult may be given orally, in writing, by gestures, or by actions, and it may be given either publicly, in the presence of the victim, or not in his presence (in which case the insult is recognized as a crime only if the accused wanted his insulting statements to become known to the victim or knowingly permitted them to become known). Insult is punishable by corrective labor for a term not exceeding six months, by a fine of up to 50 rubles, by compelling the guilty person to rectify the harm done, or by public censure. If the act was of a minor nature, measures of social pressure may be applied, including turning the case over to a comrades’ court. Greater liability has been established for an insult in print or an insult committed by a person previously found guilty of insult (if the record of conviction has not been canceled). A criminal case involving insult is initiated only on the complaint of the victim (private accusation) and may be terminated if the parties make peace before the court retires to render judgment.

Soviet criminal law provides for increased liability for insulting a representative of the government or a representative of the public who is fulfilling duties for the protection of public order, a militiaman, or a people’s guard (for example, arts. 192 and 1921 of the Criminal Code of the RSFSR).

References in classic literature ?
They were attentive but silent observers of the proceedings of the vanquished, failing in none of the stipulated military honors, and offering no taunt or insult, in their success, to their less fortunate foes.
My boy, I hope you will always defend your sister, and give anybody who insults her a good thrashing -- that is as it should be; but mind, I won't have any election blackguarding on my premises.
He was not naturally acute of perception, but those too much undervalued his understanding who deemed that this flattering compliment would obliterate the sense of the prior insult.
I described in the most pathetic manner I could the miserable state to which the Catholic religion was reduced in a country where it had lately flourished so much by the labours of the Portuguese; I gave him in the strongest terms a representation of all that we had suffered since the death of Sultan Segued, how we had been driven out of Abyssinia, how many times they had attempted to take away our lives, in what manner we had been betrayed and given up to the Turks, the menaces we had been terrified with, the insults we had endured; I laid before him the danger the patriarch was in of being either impaled or flayed alive; the cruelty, insolence and avarice of the Bassa of Suaquem, and the persecution that the Catholics suffered in Aethiopia.
It is at when thou shalt see rabble of this sort offering us insult thou art not to wait till I draw sword against them, for I shall not do so at all; but do thou draw sword and chastise them to thy heart's content, and if any knights come to their aid and defence I will take care to defend thee and assail them with all my might; and thou hast already seen by a thousand signs and proofs what the might of this strong arm of mine is equal to"- so uplifted had the poor gentleman become through the victory over the stout Biscayan.
Never till then had a more brutal accusation or meaner insults tarnished kingly majesty.
For it was their opinion that every tap of a British drum, within the peninsula of Boston was an insult to the brave old town.
Why, for a mere fancy, should I go and insult a woman?
It matters little, however, the insult has been given, and I consider myself insulted accordingly.
It was in pursuance of my duty that I had been insulted, and I bore the insult like a man.
It was quite bitter enough, she felt, that he did not come to her, but now that she had made that advance, she felt that any withdrawal on his part would, to a woman of her class, be nothing less than a flaming insult.
But the insult generally passed unnoticed both by the priest and the bellringer.