intention

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intention

1. Law the resolve or design with which a person does or refrains from doing an act, a necessary ingredient of certain offences
2. Med a natural healing process, as by first intention, in which the edges of a wound cling together with no tissue between, or by second intention, in which the wound edges adhere with granulation tissue

Intention

 

a purpose or goal; the direction or directedness of consciousness, will, and, to a certain extent, feelings toward an object. The concept of intention dates back to Scholasticism, which distinguished “primary intention,” oriented toward a particular, from “secondary intention,” oriented toward a universal.

In the 19th century the concept of intention was again introduced into philosophy by the German philosopher F. Brentano. In his view, intentionality signifies the “objectness” of any act of consciousness, that is, its necessary relatedness to a certain—real or imaginary—object. Ideas of intention and intentionality are central (as universal characteristics of consciousness) to the views of A. Meinong (Austria) and E. Husserl (Germany). These concepts, particularly through the work of Meinong, were adopted by psychology, resulting in a refinement of ideas of the nature and direction of psychic activity, as well as in the formation of the concept of set.

E. G. IUDIN

intention

A term used by ATC (air traffic control) to ask a pilot, “What do you plan to do?”
References in classic literature ?
I learned besides that Cardenio, according to report, had been present at the betrothal; and that upon seeing her betrothed contrary to his expectation, he had quitted the city in despair, leaving behind him a letter declaring the wrong Luscinda had done him, and his intention of going where no one should ever see him again.
"No." The two notaries looked at each other in mute astonishment and inquiry as to what were the real intentions of the testator.
"You are not making any mistake, are you?" said the notary; "you really mean to declare that such is not your intention?"
They brought me along with them when they deserted, either with the intention of holding me ransom or selling me into the harem of one of the black sultans of the north.
Immediately after the Englishman had been brought to Numabo's village Usanga had gone out in search of the plane, prompted partially by curiosity and partially by an intention to destroy it, but when he had found it, some new thought had deterred him from carrying out his design.
He was not one who required a detailed exposition of intentions that were quite all too obvious.
He had no love for authority, and certainly not the slightest intention of submitting to the domination of an ordinary Swede sailor.
The greatest portrait painters have painted both, man and the intention of his soul; Rembrandt and El Greco; it's only the second-raters who've only painted man.
"How the devil is one to get the intention of the soul except by painting exactly what one sees?"
We tried to unite them, with the evident intention of giving battle and checking the enemy's advance, and by this effort to unite them while avoiding battle with a much stronger enemy, and necessarily withdrawing the armies at an acute angle- we led the French on to Smolensk.
The intention was to make a stand at the Drissa camp, but Paulucci, aiming at becoming commander in chief, unexpectedly employed his energy to influence Alexander, and Pfuel's whole plan was abandoned and the command entrusted to Barclay.
Every intelligent person present could see that the prisoner's chance of an honorable acquittal depended on tracing the poison to the possession of his wife--or at least on proving her expressed intention to obtain it.