intercept station

intercept station

[′in·tər‚sept ‚stā·shən]
(communications)
Provides service for subscribers whereby calls to disconnected stations or dead lines are either routed to an intercept operator for explanation, or the calling party receives a distinctive tone that informs the party that he has made such a call has been made.
References in periodicals archive ?
The station was operational from 1913 and is thought to have been the only dedicated intercept station operated by the Navy at the outbreak of the war.
Iran also allowed CIA to install a telemetry intercept station in northeastern Iran at Kabhan, 40 miles east of Meshad in 1965 and 1966.
Massive UK intercept station in the Middle East, part of [sterling pound]1 billion project assembled by GCHQ, is exposed; Snowden denies document release
A radio intercept station located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands began picking up an unusual amount of radio traffic, with the first intercept (a conversation between Vice Admiral Halsey and Captain Marc A.
Immediately after takeoff, the section came under control of an Air Force radar ground-controlled intercept station and was vectored toward the New York City area at 15,000 feet.
The raw data for this section was obtained from the Royal Navy's intercept station at Flowerdown, Hampshire, England.
The intercept station on Stonecutter's Island still remained operational, providing raw data to Singapore.
Whether this indicated an intercept station in Auckland or Auckland as the originator of reports is not known.
Fighters, in the Soviet tactical plan, are manned interceptors, umbilically tied to a ground-controlled intercept station by radio data-link.
As with China's militarisation of the Paracel Islands further north, the additional land created around such fortresses would permit the deployment of China's latest air-defence radar systems, ground earth stations for satellite communications, signals-intelligence intercept stations and the possible deployment of anti-ship and ballistic-missile batteries.
Insiders were quoted as saying GCHQ could provide more extensive and precise technical coverage in the region than its American sister, the National Security Agency, because Britain has a better network of intercept stations in Asia.
Friendly intercept stations will have great difficulty in determining which part of the intercepted message flow is genuine: this takes considerable skill and tactical training.