interdict


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interdict

(ĭn`tərdĭkt), ecclesiastical censure notably used in the Roman Catholic Church, especially in the Middle Ages. When a parish, state, or nation is placed under the interdict no public church ceremony may take place, only certain sacraments, especially baptism, may be administered, and the dead may not receive Christian burial. The interdict is used to sway public opinion and to force action. A famous example was the interdict placed upon England during the reign of King JohnJohn,
1167–1216, king of England (1199–1216), son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Early Life

The king's youngest son, John was left out of Henry's original division of territory among his sons and was nicknamed John Lackland.
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 by Innocent IIIInnocent III,
b. 1160 or 1161, d. 1216, pope (1198–1216), an Italian, b. Anagni, named Lotario di Segni; successor of Celestine III. Innocent III was succeeded by Honorius III.
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 in 1208.

Interdict

 

a form of ecclesiastical pressure or punishment in the Catholic Church; a temporary ban placed by the pope (or sometimes by a bishop) on worship and religious ceremonies (excluding excommunication from the church) within a particular area (a local interdict). Sometimes it is placed on particular people and is known as a personal interdict. It was used widely in the 11th and 12th centuries (less frequently beginning with the 13th century) and was a powerful weapon in exerting pressure on sovereigns and feudal lords and in the war against heresy.lt has lost its former significance but still remains part of canon law.

interdict

1. RC Church the exclusion of a person or all persons in a particular place from certain sacraments and other benefits, although not from communion
2. Civil law any order made by a court or official prohibiting an act
3. Scots law an order having the effect of an injunction
4. Roman history
a. an order of a praetor commanding or forbidding an act
b. the procedure by which this order was sought
References in periodicals archive ?
Mrs McWilliams applied through a solicitor for an interim interdict, which was granted at court in 2006.
NAFAU and the Meat co workers, through their Legal Counsel, made the point that the court would only have jurisdiction to grant a temporary interdict if a dispute had firstly registered with the Office of the Labour Commissioner, in terms of Chapter 8 of the Labour Act.
In an attempted last-minute compromise, Cosatu and the ANC offered a 30-day hiatus to the toll's launch, but it was too late and the following day the court handed down the interdict that scuppered the project in its present form.
Paul Vernon put it, ``Anything that puts more teeth in helping to interdict gang crime is good.
In order to effectively and efficiently conduct identity checks against those lists, a company should plan to use one or more automated interdict software packages as part of its OFAC compliance program.
We stepped up law enforcement on drug dealers and tried to interdict the import and export of drugs.
Louis voted to retain control of its nearly $10 million in assets, despite threats of interdict from Archbishop Raymond Burke, according to the Chicago Tribune.
Hamilton Sheriff Court heard that an interim interdict had been granted against O'Neill.
The Japan-hosted multilateral maritime exercises conducted Tuesday off Sagami Bay, Kanagawa Prefecture, to interdict weapons of mass destruction have highlighted a major legal problem the country has in promoting the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI).
She was granted an interim interdict after she told a court she had been attacked in the street by members of Ballantyne's family.
Specifically the counter terrorism fellowship will be used to bolster the capacity of friendly foreign nations to detect, monitor, and interdict or disrupt the activities of terrorist networks.
But if he continues being abusive to you, you can contact a solicitor with a view to raising an interdict or interim interdict.