interdict

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interdict

(ĭn`tərdĭkt), ecclesiastical censure notably used in the Roman Catholic Church, especially in the Middle Ages. When a parish, state, or nation is placed under the interdict no public church ceremony may take place, only certain sacraments, especially baptism, may be administered, and the dead may not receive Christian burial. The interdict is used to sway public opinion and to force action. A famous example was the interdict placed upon England during the reign of King JohnJohn,
1167–1216, king of England (1199–1216), son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Early Life

The king's youngest son, John was left out of Henry's original division of territory among his sons and was nicknamed John Lackland.
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 by Innocent IIIInnocent III,
b. 1160 or 1161, d. 1216, pope (1198–1216), an Italian, b. Anagni, named Lotario di Segni; successor of Celestine III. Innocent III was succeeded by Honorius III.
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 in 1208.

Interdict

 

a form of ecclesiastical pressure or punishment in the Catholic Church; a temporary ban placed by the pope (or sometimes by a bishop) on worship and religious ceremonies (excluding excommunication from the church) within a particular area (a local interdict). Sometimes it is placed on particular people and is known as a personal interdict. It was used widely in the 11th and 12th centuries (less frequently beginning with the 13th century) and was a powerful weapon in exerting pressure on sovereigns and feudal lords and in the war against heresy.lt has lost its former significance but still remains part of canon law.

interdict

1. RC Church the exclusion of a person or all persons in a particular place from certain sacraments and other benefits, although not from communion
2. Civil law any order made by a court or official prohibiting an act
3. Scots law an order having the effect of an injunction
4. Roman history
a. an order of a praetor commanding or forbidding an act
b. the procedure by which this order was sought
References in periodicals archive ?
Dans le chapitre intitule "Of Mimicry and Man" (85-92), le critique identifie deux modes de representation du sujet colonise dans l'imaginaire colonial: le premier, visant a parer aux anxietes soulevees par le sujet colonise, deforme celui-ci en un double reconnaissable et edulcore du colon, sans toutefois qu'on puisse confondre l'un et l'autre ("a reformed, recognizable Other, as a subject of a difference that is almost the same, but not quite"); le second se caracterise par la representation de sujets colonises evocateurs de ce que Bhabha nomme une "interdictory alterity," autrement dit irreductibles a l'ordre signifiant colonial.
There was resistance, and accounting-based calculations became involved in interdictory discussions and arguments.
It is seen to receive material expression in new architectural inventions developed to segregate 'interdictory space' from the wider residential and public territories of the city.
The film is topped off by a virtuoso machine-gun montage where the three expert voices, both interdictory and sympathetic, literally cancel each other out.
Both countries now tolerate limited access to the Internet, although both have also installed sophisticated and, in the long run, prohibitively expensive interdictory processes to maintain their control.