interests


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interests

the particular social outcomes held to benefit a particular individual or group. Such interests may be those recognized and pursued by the person or group, or they may be identified by others, including social scientists, as underlying or ‘objective’ interests, unrecognized by the persons concerned. MARXISM is an example of a theory in which the distinction between apparent interests and underlying, objective, interests plays an important role (see FALSE CONSCIOUSNESS).
References in classic literature ?
There are again two methods of removing the causes of faction: the one, by destroying the liberty which is essential to its existence; the other, by giving to every citizen the same opinions, the same passions, and the same interests.
Listen, then, he said; I proclaim that justice is nothing else than the interest of the stronger.
You are confident that then man will cease from intentional error and will, so to say, be compelled not to want to set his will against his normal interests.
Again Miss Davidson began making efforts to enlist the interest and help of the coloured and white people in and near Tuskegee.
Among the most formidable of the obstacles which the new Constitution will have to encounter may readily be distinguished the obvious interest of a certain class of men in every State to resist all changes which may hazard a diminution of the power, emolument, and consequence of the offices they hold under the State establishments; and the perverted ambition of another class of men, who will either hope to aggrandize themselves by the confusions of their country, or will flatter themselves with fairer prospects of elevation from the subdivision of the empire into several partial confederacies than from its union under one government.
In the formation of treaties, it will regard the interest of the whole, and the particular interests of the parts as connected with that of the whole.
The Material Interest merely looked in the other's eyes without saying anything.
Rook's interest in him may surely have been a grateful interest.
Finding that I took an interest in the subject, he expressed a regret that the true nature and extent of his enterprise and its national character and importance had never been understood, and a wish that I would undertake to give an account of it.
Sometimes I feel rather lonely, especially in the evening; but I generally manage to interest myself in something or in some one.
Our interest is in a smiling, sparkling face to be seen amid the members of the Horticultural Committee; in the person with a flower in his belt, combed and brushed, and all clad in scarlet, -- a colour which makes his black hair and yellow skin stand out in violent contrast.
With a portion of this property Mr Godfrey Nickleby purchased a small farm, near Dawlish in Devonshire, whither he retired with his wife and two children, to live upon the best interest he could get for the rest of his money, and the little produce he could raise from his land.