interfacial force

interfacial force

[′in·tər‚fā·shəl ¦fȯrs]
(fluid mechanics)
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References in periodicals archive ?
where [p.sub.c] is capillary pressure (Pa), [p.sub.nw] the pressure in the NAPL (Pa), [p.sub.w] the pressure in aqueous phase liquid (Pa), a the interfacial force (N/m), [theta] the contact angle of the two-phase fluid interface with the fracture wall (rad), and r the average radius of curvature in the single rough-walled fracture (m).
A key efficacy metric for surfactants is the reduction of the interfacial force, which is the force that keeps the oil trapped within pores.
The system has 2.940 pounds of total interfacial force to handle any job.
The nature and the interfacial force connection depend on the structure, on the surface characteristics of the fibers (roughness, determined surface, porosity, crystal dimension, the presence of functional classifications chemical active) and on structural characteristics of the matrix (chemical composition, macromolecules conformation).
Houston, A new force sensor incorporating force-feedback control for interfacial force microscopy, Rev.
We describe the development and applications of the interfacial force microscope (IFM), which involves force compensation on the sensor that ensures the tip position accurately follows the z-positioning actuator, independent of load.
Two years later, they came up with the interfacial force microscope.
Interfacial tension (mN/m) Blend Palierne Choi-Schowalter [PTT.sub.90] 8.5 9.7 [PTT.sub.80] 9.4 10.5 [PTT.sub.70] 12.7 13.4 The relative importance of applied viscous force and counteracting interfacial force can be expressed by Taylor equation derived from the studies of deformation and disintegration of the dispersed phase for Newtonian systems in simple shear fields in the absence of coalescence effects (47).
By balancing the interfacial force and the shear force, he predicted the maximum drop size that would be stable for small deformations in Newtonian fluids.
Most methods are based on a balance between a driving force (gravitational, centrifugal, brownian motion, shearing force) and an interfacial force that tends to minimize the contact area between the phases.
This is due to the descending interfacial force, which is smaller in lower junction angles.
Similarly to the Rayleigh instability phenomenon, the kinetics of drop retraction are controlled by the balance between the interfacial force, which tends to restore the spherical shape, and the viscous stresses, which oppose such a relaxation.