interferometer systems

interferometer systems

[‚in·tə·fə′räm·əd·ər ‚sis·təmz]
(electronics)
Method of determining the position of a target in azimuth by using an interferometer to compare the phases of signals at the output terminals of a pair of antennas receiving a common signal from a distant source.
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In most interferometer systems, the baseline is between 0.1 and 0.5[lambda].
Figure 3 shows a four-dipole array used in many interferometer systems. From the top view, you can see there are six pairs of antennas (i.e., six baselines) in this array.
Significant differences exist between the dual aperture and single aperture interferometer systems. For example, the single aperture interferometer system uses only two optics, a laser head and a retroreflector, making it much easier and faster to align and setup.
The two primary systems for linear displacement and volumetric calibration of machine tools and CMMs include the dual aperture laser interferometer system and the single aperture interferometer system.
Inspired by the successes of the pioneering interferometer systems in England, the Netherlands, and California, NRAO then built the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in the high desert of central New Mexico.
and Canadian radio astronomers developed interferometer systems with no direct connections between the elements.
This is such a difficult task that most deployed interferometer systems use some type of calibration scheme to correct phase mismatches.