interlock


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interlock

a device, esp one operated electromechanically, used in a logic circuit or electrical safety system to prevent an activity being initiated unless preceded by certain events
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Interlock

 

a set of methods and facilities that ensure holding the operating parts (components) of an apparatus, machine, or circuit (electrical) in a definite state which is maintained regardless of whether the interlocking action ceases. Interlocking increases the safety of service and the operating reliability of equipment, ensures the required operational sequence for mechanisms and components, and restricts the motions of mechanisms to the limits of the operating zone. The state (position) of operating parts in an object is held, depending on the operating principle of the interlocking device, by mechanical, magnetic, optical, or electrical means. Interlocking is discontinued by an action that returns the locked portions of an apparatus, machine, or circuit to the initial condition (before the interlocking) or permits a transition into another operating position by the presence of a corresponding signal. Interlocking can be achieved by manual, semiautomatic, and automatic means. In electrical equipment or in equipment having an electrical control, an interlock is set up to counter simultaneous actions or an incorrect sequence of connections or disconnections by interrupting the electrical power circuits; in machines with a hydraulic drive, an interlock shuts off the valves in the supply system; and so on. For example, in domestic gas hot water heaters there is an interlocking device that turns off the gas supply if the inflow of water is interrupted.

Interlocking is extensively employed in transportation, electric power stations and substations, industrial plants, computing equipment, and various production and domestic apparatus and devices.

I. E. DEKABRUN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

interlock

[′in·tər‚läk]
(computer science)
A mechanism, implemented in hardware or software, to coordinate the activity of two or more processes within a computing system, and to ensure that one process has reached a suitable state such that the other may proceed.
(engineering)
A switch or other device that prevents activation of a piece of equipment when a protective door is open or some other hazard exists.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

interlock

A device that prohibits an action from taking place.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
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