intermittent work

intermittent work

[¦in·tər¦mit·ənt ′wərk]
(industrial engineering)
A type of task requiring moderate to highly demanding physical effort that is interrupted by short periods of rest or light work lasting a few seconds to a few minutes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The Conservatives also equate being in employment with a significant improvement in your quality of life - obviously not true if temporary and intermittent work and poor practices are damaging your health.
On the other hand, JO workers must be limited to emergency or intermittent work such as clearing of debris on the roads, canals; trades and crafts; and manual tasks such as carpentry, plumbing, painting, electrical and the like that are not part of the regular functions of the agency.
The possibility of obtaining high-quality surfaces with properties that improve the performance of products can be provided using grinding wheels with intermittent work surfaces.
The hiring of job order workers has also been limited to emergency or intermittent work such as clearing of debris on the roads, canals; trades and crafts, and manual tasks such as carpentry, plumbing, painting, electrical and the like that are not part of the regular functions of the agency.
The CAC found some riders do very little or only intermittent work for Deliveroo, while others take as much work as possible.
It is however not clear what impact the three task elements that characterize intermittent work, namely force level variations, duty cycle, and cycle time, have on fatigue development.
Defining the "preparatory or supplemental works" and "work that is intermittent by necessity" under Article 108 of the Labour Law and the roles of guard and janitor, and setting the limit on the working hours for preparatory or supplemental works, and intermittent work;
I remain puzzled, in particular, by the assertion that "coal miners worked in conditions that were more traditionally 'industrial' than the casual "on-again-off-again work of textile mill hands." (112) Much coal-mining was far from "industrial," and why would intermittent work make textile mills less industrial?
One of them is Stephen Tripp, 40, who's starting a job this month in the Minneapolis area as a cook at Aramark, a corporate food-services provider, after years of intermittent work at country clubs and restaurants.
They are the marginalized in our society, mostly dependent on economic activities in the informal sector marked by intermittent work and incomes from either nonregular jobs or unstable livelihoods.
Gallup's income measures are strongly associated with the proportion of adult residents in each country who say they are employed full time for an employer -- a measure Gallup refers to as "Payroll to Population." The Payroll to Population metric gauges the prevalence of formal full-time employment in a country, as opposed to part-time or intermittent work or subsistence-level self-employment.