internal broaching

internal broaching

[in′tərn·əl ′brōch·iŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
The removal of material on internal surfaces, by means of a tool with teeth of progressively increasing size moving in a straight line or other prescribed path over the surface, other than for the origination of a hole.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Internal broaching requires a starting hole or opening in the workpiece so the broaching tool can be inserted.
For internal broaching, the length of a broach in relation to its diameter may determine whether it must be pulled rather than pushed through the workpiece, for a broach tool is stronger in tension than in compression.
Vertical internal broaching machines are table-up, pull-up, pull-down or push-down, depending on their mode of operation.
Some common applications of internal broaching are cutting irregular or special forms such as projections, splines, channels, grooves, keyways, or gear teeth.

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