internal pressure

internal pressure

[in′tərn·əl ′presh·ər]
(physics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stress is later calculated from internal pressure and height of the "balloon"; strain is differentiated from actual and original grid sizes.
Chillers typically see 5-7 psi internal pressure loss, which must be taken into account when sizing the pump, says Tom Benson, sales and marketing v.p.
Most rotary unions are designed for internal pressure where the fluid pressure is on the inside of the mechanical seal.
In addition, the Regular Division (Redi) die from Addex Inc., Boston, uses a new flow-channel design to promote high flow while reducing internal pressure. As a result, the patent-pending die can be built to diameters larger than 15 in., Addex says.
The fixtures are vented to the atmosphere to prevent the buildup of internal pressure. The oven is heated to 150[degrees]C and the test fixtures are heated for three- or four-day intervals.
The internal pressure of the unit will decrease during the transit from Earth to Jupiter.
When sufficiently heated, the core will soften and expand, generating internal pressure to form a 3-D shape that can have varying thickness, and simultaneously bonding the face sheets (see PT, April '89, p.
The material then cools under decreasing internal pressure. When the part has solidified enough, the clamping unit will open and the part will fall out.
The film expands to about 10 mm thickness, and the internal pressure of the foam is enough to form the part.