internal stress

internal stress

[in′tərn·əl ′stres]
(mechanics)
A stress system within a solid that is not dependent on external forces. Also known as residual stress.

internal stress

The stress that exists in a component (for example, at a joint) in the absence of applied external forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
The heat improves blood flow to heal any areas of the body that are stiff and sore and causes internal stress, while the relaxing massage comforts and relieves emotional stress.
This brings returns in faster processing, and also reduces internal stress that could cause environmental stress cracking of the finished caps.
A source said: "The idea is causing internal stress within the family.
Although internal stress is not itself a defect, it often is a factor in defects such as cracking, lifting, curling, chipping, and peeling.
To enable prediction of the levels of internal stress generated during processing and to determine appropriate processing windows, the evolution of the modulus of an epoxy-amine system during cure has been characterized and described with a phenomenological model.
The single roll roller die with its zero pressure final shaping feature is said to offer improved dimensional accuracy of profiles; improved productivity, especially in a short run length environment; reduction or elimination of uncontrollable variables such as die swell, screw throw effect and internal stress in extrudate; reduced hard tooling costs; and either a simplex or multiplex environment, according to the manufacturer.
The least amount of internal stress is obtained by using a hot mold, hot sheet, and very rapid vacuum and/or compressed air.
Fitch's internal stress testing of ASBC's commercial real estate loan book with the addition of the recently issued common equity results in a tangible common equity to tangible assets ratio that is fairly consistent with the current ratings.
noting the vertical deflection needle according to the horizontal displacement profile is obtained, which allows to study the surface roughness parameters, the thickness of the deposited layer, calculating the internal stress of the material and after the tribological tests evaluated wear sample.
Since the crystalline portion will have a higher density and more shrinkage than the amorphous portion, there is a great deal of internal stress developed within the part as one side shrinks more than the other.
Temperature and humidity cycling can cause spikes in internal stress to the point of cracking and lifting.
Green, Tandon, and Sglavo figured that changing this internal stress profile could alter the way the glass splits apart.

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