internist

(redirected from internists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

internist

Chiefly US
a physician who specializes in internal medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
Specialists who want the internist to manage another field entirely, such as a dermatologist telling the internist what to prescribe for a patient's diabetes.
While slides on paper cannot replicate the interactive format we have on the Knowmedge website, I believe residents and internists will find them a useful asset during their preparations.
While most internists (85 percent) and family physicians (87 Percent) accept Medicare, only 53 Percent of internists and 62 percent of family physicians accept MassHealth.
Their answers differed from those of internists and family physicians when they were asked to consider how they would manage the same hypothetical patient.
Virtually every hospital or large medical group in the United States would be happy to add a family physician or general internist," notes Merritt Hawkins' president Mark Smith.
But internists and emergency physicians were more likely to prescribe macrolides, which may be because these physicians see more patients with complicated conditions, she said.
Salary equity among male and female internists in Pennsylvania.
An increased emphasis in gynecology by internists would therefore provide patients with increased options.
Care Choices' Web site states that members must select a primary-care physician, and that physician could bean internist.
On closer examination, diagnoses of Gulf War syndrome are often replaced by findings of depression, stress reactions, and related disturbances, reports a team led by internist Michael J.
In a study published in the June 1997 issue of Gastroenterology, diverticulitis patients treated by gastroenterologists experienced shorter hospital stays and a lower risk of readmission than patients treated by family practitioners or internists.
Internists, pediatricians, Ob-Gyns and psychiatrists - the primary care front line - have become managed care "gatekeepers," entrusted to absorb many of the responsibilities of the specialist and make fewer specialist referrals as a result.