Interpenetrate

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Interpenetrate

A decorative feature, such as a molding, that enters another element, such as a column, and reappears on the other side; it was commonly found in the Gothic Revival style.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
From (22), the interpenetration velocity [delta] at the restitution period can be obtained:
The expansions in the university's student enrollments and academic contents exhibit the intensifying interpenetration of the global and universal with the local and particular.
4 of the final interpenetration length we can see that it is only changed by the chains' parameters.
Posthuman subjectivity similarly represents a "two-sided form," as it results from the interpenetration of opposites: "When two-sided forms are personified, the metamorphs so created open up and dramatize the form of self-referential paradoxes.
One photograph--illustrating the interpenetration of cultures--is of a group working together on the BBC Eastern Service in 1944.
Pirani (sociology, University of Roma) and Varga (sociology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario) look at the interpenetration of human bodies and technology.
Tieck's Marchen are all his own, ranging from terror to artifice and the interpenetration of the quotidian by 'das Wunderbare'.
Interpenetration adds an operational dimension to the structural coupling between social and psychological systems (Luhmann, 1988; 1995a, p.
The careful interpenetration of inside and outside spaces both at ground level and on the first floor--with some fine part-covered terraces and balconies--allows visitors and users to advance or retreat from the outside world as and when they wish.
In the work of the practice, modestly presented, one could get a sense of the effects of Cubism on the designs: framelessness, floating planes, interpenetration of spaces, and sometimes asymmetrical interiors.
Yet several essays point out earlier evidence of clerical participation, a more pervasive presence of theological reflection on marriage, and greater interpenetration of secular and ecclesiastical views of marriage than we have been accustomed to expect.