interplanetary flight

interplanetary flight

[¦in·tər′plan·ə‚ter·ē ′flīt]
(aerospace engineering)
Flight through the region of space between the planets, under the primary gravitational influence of the sun.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1950, Clarke published a non-fiction book, "Interplanetary Flight", which discussed the logistics behind space travel.
Nobody has ever tried it of course, but in theory it makes sense to suspend a body in some sort of stasis for the duration of an interplanetary flight...
Aside from his involvement in nuclear bomb development, Garwin held many ideas for applying science to better living, from preventing flu epidemics to enabling interplanetary flight, and he also made powerful and often controversial scientific claims that landed him in trouble with fellow scientists.
The rest of the book deals with more advanced and more specialized topics, among them interplanetary flight, re-entry, the three-body problem, orbit perturbations, and rigid-body dynamics.
An instrument on the Soviet Union's Lunik 2 Moon probe detected particles of solar wind as early as 1959, but its pervasive and continuous nature wasn't verified until Mariner 2's four months of interplanetary flight. Sky & Telescope's first reference to solar wind appeared in May 1964, when Parker's April 1964 Scientific American article, "The Solar Wind," was spotlighted.
It also calls for accelerating research into global climate change through more comprehensive Earth observations, and achieving a step-by-step approach of new achievements in interplanetary flight, including a human mission to a near-Earth object.
You're presented details of your interplanetary flight path and orbit, and you can make adjustments as you go.
This degree of precision is not, however, sufficient for the fine celestial navigation required of interplanetary flights or stellar visits; but for practical purposes, here and now, 99.99 percent of the time, Polaris can be considered as fixed at true north.
That assumption may not hold up, though, as recent research has shown that some microbes are hardier than expected, and others may use various protective mechanisms to survive interplanetary flights. ( ANI )
That assumption may not hold up, though, as recent research has shown that some microbes are hardier than expected, and others may use various protective mechanisms to survive interplanetary flights. Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern because spores can withstand certain sterilization procedures and may best be able to survive the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces.

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