interplanetary probe


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Related to interplanetary probe: Space probes

interplanetary probe

[¦in·tər′plan·ə‚ter·ē ′prōb]
(aerospace engineering)
An instrumented spacecraft that flies through the region of space between the planets.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sensors that help soldiers detect buried bombs in Afghanistan also have application in NASA interplanetary probes.
After 135 launches that have put in place much of the satellite infrastructure on which modern communications depend, as well launching several interplanetary probes, that image is set to be consigned to history.
Io is just one wonder among many uncovered in the last 50 years with the advent of the space age and its interplanetary probes, space-based telescopes, and other technological advances.
Australia has extensive launch ranges, Canada has expertise in radar imaging satellites, and India has across-the-board capabilities including launch vehicles, satellites and now interplanetary probes, he said.
Benson is a journalist, filmmaker, and photographer whose previous book Beyond: Visions of Interplanetary Probes has been the source for exhibitions sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution and the American Museum of Natural History in New York.
After studying part 1, readers should have a basic comprehension of the complexities surrounding the design of interplanetary probes and landers.
He established the production line that turned out more than 260 Agenas used by Discoverer/Corona and other National Reconnaissance Office programs, NASA's Lunar Orbiter and Mariner interplanetary probes, and other space projects.
NASA usually emphasizes big, individually managed projects, such as interplanetary probes, whose completion depends on annual appropriations from Congress for each satellite.
But new technologies could turn slightly larger versions of today's CubeSat designs into budget-priced interplanetary probes by the end of the decade.
Chertok also records the development and launch of such satellites as Sputnik (in 1957) and of lunar and interplanetary probes.
Besides interplanetary probes, Myers said, "the establishing of a space station is the new era that we really are moving into.
That concern, in fact, is manifested in the design of Giotto itself, which comes without a tape recorder of the sort used by many interplanetary probes to play back data gathered more rapidly than can be directly passed along by radio.