interposer

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interposer

An electrical interface between connectors. An interposer often connects contacts of different sizes together. For several examples, see BGA.
References in periodicals archive ?
The motion court providently exercised its discretion in granting defendants' cross motion for an extension of time to interpose an answer.
The court stated that where counsel in the hearing of the jury make statements of prejudicial matters, which are not in evidence, it is the duty of the court to interpose and prevent the same and all needful and proper instructions to the jury endeavor to remove the improper impression from their minds.
The government says Arizona is trying to ''interpose'' its own judgments on ''national security, law enforcement, foreign policy, humanitarian considerations and the rights of law-abiding citizens and aliens.'' It says the Constitution and Congress, in the Immigration and Nationality Act, give the executive branch authority to handle those issues.
The promised world army has repeatedly failed to interpose itself between warring forces.
"The tampering will interpose a political layer between a High Court judge and the issuing of an arrest warrant, enabling perhaps Gaddafi to be arrested but an Israeli, with whom our political masters are friends, not to be arrested." it said.M.A.
"I don't believe you should be able to hit children, but I do believe that teachers need to know they can physically restrain children, they can interpose themselves between two children that may be causing trouble, and they can remove them from the classroom."
2 : to introduce between parts of a conversation <May I interpose a question?>
As Sedgwick goes on to suggest in this letter, such work additionally had economic and political dimensions, representing, as Banks argues, a first step outside the confining gender norms of the era and into activity that went beyond the solely religious to interpose in the socioeconomic realities of others.