interpret

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interpret

[in′tər·prət]
(computer science)
To print on a punched card the information punched in that card.

interpret

To run a program one line at a time. Each line of source language is translated into machine language and then executed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Students were instructed to find another class member, and to go round the table as a pair, interpreting a painting for each other in turn.
New York: Although the doctrine is pervasive in interpreting state income taxes, there are exceptions.
During the next class, we used SPSS to analyze the data, interpreted related concepts, and evaluated assumptions before interpreting statistics and making inferences.
Monk and Nemirovsky (1994), who closely examined the processes by which a high school student developed expertise in interpreting graphs generated by activation of a physical model, claim that the immediacy of the use of the physical model in the learning context enabled the student to move beyond a purely visual interpretation of graphs.
Shakespeare's Ovid convenes distinguished senior scholars as well as a few newer voices and serves as an appropriate capstone to a central critical tradition of interpreting Ovid's influence on Shakespeare's imagination.
Within Ruby, the community members constantly engage in interpreting each other.
Not surprisingly, a bestseller this big has generated whole libraries of books explaining, interpreting, and commenting on its meaning, history, and importance--as well as monstrous concordances tracking and counting every jot and tittle appearing between Genesis and Revelation.
COLLABORATIVE INTERPRETING SYSTEM - THE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Daisy Y.
But when it comes to the bottom line, translation and interpreting become a key component.
Its anchor and its impetus are found in the human act of interpreting the Word of God.
I suspect the amygdala is important for interpreting all types of signals people use to communicate what they're thinking, not just those concerned with fear and anger.
In this volume Thomas Schlereth brings together fourteen previously published and two new articles that discuss the value of material culture study in understanding America's past and the role of museums in interpreting material culture.

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