interregnum


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interregnum

1. an interval between two reigns, governments, incumbencies, etc.
2. any period in which a state lacks a ruler, government, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In-between the two are the aforesaid groupings of big names that are hyperactive in the period leading to the delicate interregnum when, as pre-announced, the ruling government has to be downsized for routine work.
Chapter four deliberately erases the Restoration divide by arguing that heroic drama connects the interregnum masque to drama performed in the 1660s and 1670s.
The interregnum will eventually end and a new order will be born.
The concluding section addresses the neglected final months of the Interregnum to offer a fresh interpretation of why this once-radical army meekly acquiesced in the Restoration of Charles II in 1660.
Free quarter was a major issue throughout the Interregnum, despite the government's efforts to limit this practice.
The diary is particularly useful in our efforts to understand Interregnum religious disputes at a local level.
In the interregnum, however, the Congress has managed to soften the DMK by extending its backing to party chief M.
At the end of the service, churchwarden Margaret Kenworthy expressed thanks to Dean Henry and the Revs John and Jenny Barnes for their ministry during the interregnum. She presented Dean Henry with a book token on behalf of the congregation, saying that parishioners still hoped to see him from time to time.
"While MGNREGA is intended to fill the 'job deficit' in the interregnum, we have to focus on longer-term inclusive growth strategies," the survey said.
He replaces Felipe Calderon, who has ruled the country for 12 years of an interregnum for the Institutional Revolutionary Party which has governed Mexico for 71 years.
During the interregnum the Church will be run by the Vatican Secretary of State, Cardinal Jean Villot of France, and the College of Cardinals.
Chapters 3 and 4, are, in turn, devoted to the Interregnum and the Restoration, respectively.