interrogate

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Related to interrogative: interrogative sentence

interrogate

(1) To search, sum or count records in a file. See query.

(2) To test the condition or status of a terminal or computer system.

interrogate

To send coded signals of IFF (identification friend or foe) or SSR (secondary surveillance radar) to trigger their transponders.
References in classic literature ?
I was saying," said the intruder, without attending to the interrogatives, - "I was saying that I am not at all pushed for time - that the business upon which I took the liberty of calling, is of no pressing importance - in short, that I can very well wait until you have finished your Exposition.
Cette tournure interrogative particuliere aide une partie, au detriment de l'autre, pour s'orienter vers le [beaucoup moins que]tour en train de se faire[beaucoup plus grand que], selon Jerome Jacquin.
Scharf analyzes the prose section of the Visnu-Purana and points out that the interrogative particle api usually occurs initially in the clause, and interrogatives never appear in the clause-final position.
Thus Lathrop's "contradicted" can be more accurately articulated as "questioned," since the interactions between the opposites are really mutually interrogative, preventing them from being resolved.
Here, guests Google their names plus an interrogative lead-in.
What is more, there is a generally greater vernacular approach when they negate these combinations, which is not the case regarding the interrogative syntactic form.
Its example is the learners' avoidance of auxiliary inversion in the interrogative sentences of English.
In this construction, the verb have is followed by an interrogative infinitival clause.
SARGODHA -- The District Police Officer Sohail Chaudhary awarded punishments to nine policemen over poor performance, and irresponsible/ignorant behaviour in interrogative and operational matters.
The police have started to make money under the banner of NAP rather than to play effective role to check crimes and it has become interrogative sign for interior ministry.
In the Economist this week, the lead editorial framed the interrogative in an even broader context: In an era when disruptive companies like Uber and Airbnb are stealing the show, is the traditional concept of the "company" something of an anachronism?