interrogator


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interrogator

[in′ter·ə‚gād·ər]
(electronics)
A radar transmitter which sends out a pulse that triggers a transponder; usually combined in a single unit with a responsor, which receives the reply from a transponder and produces an output suitable for actuating a display of some navigational parameter. Also known as challenger; interrogator-transmitter.

interrogator

i. A radar set or other electronic device that transmits an interrogation. Normally, ground-based surveillance radar beacon transmitter-receiver scanning in synchronism with primary radar continuously transmitted signals requesting replies from all cooperative airborne transponders. The received signals are mixed with the primary radar return and displayed on the same plan position indicator (PPI).
ii. An electronic device for transmitting challenging or interrogating pulses for reception and response by a transponder.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the interrogators told her that "You have eyes like an angel" then tries to explain how she is like his sister who "spends all his money on clothes."
Systematically implemented, the policy includes violence and degradation during arrest and interrogation; inhuman detention conditions that force detainees to endure crowding and filth; isolation of detainees, subjecting them to extreme sensory, motor, and social deprivation; provision of scant and substandard food; exposure to extremes of heat and cold; prolonged binding to a chair during interrogation, sometimes in exceedingly painful positions; extensive sleep deprivation; threats, swearing, shouting and mocking -- and in some cases even direct violence by interrogators.
My interrogators worked professionally and tirelessly to keep me on edge at every step of the questioning process over several days.
These tactics were used "just to get her to interact with the interrogators", Bassem al-Tamimi, her father, told reporters at the conference.
This makes an interrogator's reputation among the population as important as his rapport with the individual--maybe more so, depending on the value a specific detainee group places on character.
Omar Khadr told a US military tribunal, which is due to sentence him after he admitted killing an US soldier in Afghanistan, that his interrogators told him about another prisoner who had been transferred to a facility that held "big black guys" because he had lied to authorities.
A court source said: "Could you imagine being the accused and turning up to find yourself facing The Interrogator? "Instead of holding a full trial, they could simply have put the person in a room with Mr McAdam for five minutes and known the truth."
One was a permanent interrogator called Ja'fari and another man referred to as Hajj Agha, a religious honorific, she never saw.
The interrogator loses himself one morning peering into the mirror, searching for answers.
The 2004 document revealed one interrogator said a colleague told Khalid Sheikh Mohammed that if any other attacks happened in the US, "we're going to kill your children".
The document, released by the US Justice Department, revealed that one interrogator said a colleague told Khalid Sheikh Mohammed that if any other attacks happened in the United States, "we're going to kill your children".
Guilt by Statistical Association: Revisiting the Prosecutor's Fallacy and the Interrogator's Fallacy, CARMEN DE MACEDO