interspersed repeats

interspersed repeats

[‚in·tər‚spərsd ri′pēts]
(cell and molecular biology)
Repetitive deoxyribonucleic acid sequences.
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References in periodicals archive ?
53% of the buffalo DNA (23083 bp) comprises interspersed repeats represented by 46 small interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) 18 long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINEs) 17 long terminal repeat elements (LTR) and 9 DNA elements.
The largest multigene family recognized so far is the Plasmodium interspersed repeats (pir) which includes repetitive interspersed family (rif) in P.
Interspersed repeats, also known as transposable elements, are DNA sequences that can "jump" around the genome, causing mutations in the host and contributing to expansion of the genome.
Interspersed repeats account for a significant fraction of mammalian genomes, and some of these elements are still actively mobile.
In humans, interspersed repeats account for approximately 44 per cent of the entire genome sequence.
Stephan Schuster and his research group at Penn State University, who were involved in the sequencing and analysis of the mammoth genome, are now looking deeper into the sequence for interspersed repeats.
The mammoth genome is an excellent candidate for comparative analysis of interspersed repeats in mammals, as it had a remarkably large genome of approximately 4.
Using the mammoth genome sequence and sequences of other mammals for comparison, Schuster's group found that the mammoth genome contained the largest proportion of interspersed repeats of any other mammal studied.
This collection of nine articles for professionals and other advanced readers covers the most recent techniques in what has become ongoing and mutual advancement in computational genomics, including the process of identifying functional elements through conservation in comparative genomics, the process of computational analysis and paleogenomics of interspersed repeats in eukaryotes, eukaryotic transcriptional regulation in signals and interactions as well as modules, sequence alignment, computational challenges in microarray analysis, computational analysis of HIV molecular sequences, biological databases, the roles of clusters and grids in distributed computational biology, and a case study in genomic sequence analysis for constrained heaviest segments.