interspersion


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interspersion

[‚in·tər′spər·zhən]
(cell and molecular biology)
A regular pattern of alternating sequences of repetitious and nonrepetitious deoxyribonucleic acid in the genome of eukaryotes.
(ecology)
An intermingling of different organisms within a community.
The level or degree of intermingling of one kind of organism with others in the community.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise interesting is that the non-interspersion of baseline trials was related to the delayed emergence of equivalence, whereas the interspersion was related to delayed emergence of symmetry besides equivalence.
By prediction, largest patch index (LPI), aggregation index (AI), and interspersion juxtaposition index (IJI) will be reduced at different degrees by 2026.
The stories of each mission unfold through the interspersion of historical explanation and mission-tape transcriptions.
For northern bobwhites, usable space requires fine-scale interspersion of brush for protective cover, open areas for forbs, and bare ground for foraging (Kuvlesky et al., 2002; Hiller et al., 2005).
Replete with writing tips and sample assignments, their extensively researched text has much to recommend it, particularly the interspersion of 12 featured excerpts of film theory and criticism (called "Critical Voices").
Typically, variables related to choice of task, task variation, pace of instruction, interspersion of high-probability tasks, partial versus whole-task instruction, task difficulty, reducing learner errors, and so on have been included in the treatment packages to reduce escape-motivated problem behavior (Munk & Repp, 1994).
Interspersion of these habitats has declined in Midwestern landscapes (e.g., Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources 1994, Warner 1994, Ribic et al.
The patterns were originally identified as circumlocution, narrative interspersion, and recursion by Ball (1992) when she examined the written texts of African-American adolescents, who are speakers of a nonstandard dialect of English, namely, African-American Vernacular English.
The forest has a high interspersion of private land.
Movement across open spaces among habitat patches may readily occur because the species is adapted to a natural interspersion of open and wooded habitats.
Waters combines powerful, menacing sounds with moments of real poignancy, and I loved the dramatic theatre created by the interspersion of gunfire and marching feet.
Mullen is concerned with matching up the aesthetic and ethical dimensions of her verse, asserting the political effect of the volume's defamiliarizing structure in terms of its interspersion of high and mass cultures, its tonal breaks and turns, its allusive play, and its concern with the shifting nature of identity.