interview

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interview

a method of collecting social data at the INDIVIDUAL LEVEL. This face-to-face method ensures a higher RESPONSE RATE than POSTAL QUESTIONNAIRES, but can introduce INTERVIEWER BIAS by the effect different interviewers have on the quality VALIDITY and RELIABILITY of the data so collected.

Interviews may be structured, with the interviewer asking set questions and the respondents’ replies being immediately categorized. This format allows ease of analysis and less possibility of interviewer bias, but the data will not be as ‘rich’ as that elicited by an unstructured design (and may be subject to problems such as MEASUREMENT BY FIAT – see also CICOUREL). Unstructured interviews are desirable when the initial exploration of an area is being made, and hypotheses for further investigation being generated, or when the depth of the data required is more important than ease of analysis. See QUALITATIVE RESEARCH and QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES.

References in periodicals archive ?
RTI International interviewers are going door-to-door in Delaware conducting a study called the National Survey on Drug Use and Health on behalf of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, an agency in the U.
Start by apologising when contacting the interviewer to inform them you're running late.
Technical questions are absolutely critical as well, but, if the interview is completely focused around the technical capabilities, an interviewer may not have the opportunity to understand the candidate as a human being.
The reason for scripted sales interviews is that the interviewer doesn't have to be smart or creative or experienced.
Whether this is the interviewer trying to prove he or she knows what he or she is talking about I don't know, but that's insecurity in my book.
Essentially, your interviewer is just getting a feel for you as a potential candidate and wants to be sure you're worth their time.
Multiple aspects of the study design, including the mode of data collection and characteristics of the interviewer, can influence the quality of the data collected, especially when dealing with sensitive issues (2).
The interviewer asking questions should observe the subject and watch for visual cues.
With email you can take your time to write a polite request for feedback, and the interviewer gets the chance to respond to it when it's convenient.
There can be certain words in your resume that can irritate the interviewer, so all you have to do is 'Replace' them.
If you are perplexed at a certain question, you can pause or ask the interviewer to repeat the question so you can be surer.