intestate


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Related to intestate: Intestate succession

intestate

1. 
a. (of a person) not having made a will
b. (of property) not disposed of by will
2. a person who dies without having made a will
References in periodicals archive ?
Thinking about your own death is not a pleasant activity, but postponing the writing of a will results in dying intestate, leaving you limited or having no say in the future of your wealth, assets, business or even children.
In an intestate estate, protected homestead passes as provided in [section]732.
That's what led the court to contravene what appeared to be King's wishes and declare him intestate.
Lonnie Brockmire ("Decedent") died intestate (4) on July 18, 2011.
One of the recommendations is to amend provisions of Section 42 so as to ensure that deceased intestate (leaving apart the half for the deceased's widow, if living) succeed the property in equal.
The new rules mean that someone who dies intestate with no children, will have their entire estate distributed to their surviving spouse or civil partner.
Similarly to many other civil law jurisdictions, the contemporary Lithuanian law differentiates two ways of property transference: "Paveldejimas pagal testamentq" (a testate succession) and "Paveldejimas pagal {statymq' (an intestate succession).
IF someone dies and has not left a will they are said to have died intestate.
In all three cases, the Constitutional Court declared the African customary law rule of male primogeniture unconstitutional and struck down the entire legislative framework regulating intestate deceased estates affected by customary law and impacted by male primogeniture.
and no more" disqualifies the beneficiary as an heir by partial intestacy; but "[w]ithout the phrase 'and no more,' the provision would not prevent [the beneficiary] from taking his intestate share.
Written in a conversational style, the reference covers theory and practice, with brief explanations in sections on intestate succession, wills, estate administration, nonprofit transfers, trusts, and other estate planning concerns.