intraclast

intraclast

[′in·trə‚klast]
(geology)
A fragment of limestone formed by erosion within a basin of deposition and redeposited there to form a new sediment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coskinolina, Dictioconus and Valvulinid) and pelloid and intraclast along with marine fauna (Echinoids), sorting and grain -supported texture proposed the deposition of JA1 and JA2 in the shallow open lagoon environment of the inner ramp.
Intraclast. A particle (clast) that was deposited, lithified, broken loose, and reworked into the same deposit in which it was originally laid down.
- Alternation of dolomite and thick-bedded Limestone containing pellet, ooid, intraclast
The unit often displays other hydrodynamic structures such as ripple marks, cross-lamination thrusting, features cutting and filling gaps with intraformal conglomerates with argillaceous silt intraclast grading features at the top.
SWB is generally recognized by sharp erosional bases, graded bedding, hummocky cross bedding, bioturbation, intraclast lags, winnowed shell and suspension load deposits (Mohseni and Asim, 2006; Nichlos, 2009; Neumann et al., 2009).
Distribution curve of bioclast in the lower part is varied and this shows its abundance in compare with plate, extraclast and intraclast.
The non skeletal grains identified from the petrological study are intraclast,pelletsandooidswhiletheskeletalgrainsrepresentthefossilcontent.
Photomicrogtaphs of lime mud-wackstone showing ostracods (Os), extraclast of quartz (Qt) and iron coated intraclast (In) embedded in a matrix.
The notably alternating composition of the sediment (more carbonate intraclasts along with more carbonate cement vs almost only quartz and feldspar grains along with less cement) accents even further these laminae.
In the analyzed thin sections from La Luna Formation, light lenticular structures were found, that have been interpreted as intraclasts, produced by erosion and reworking from deep currents inside the basin (Schieber et al., 2010).
The inorganic constituents described [6] are: (i) calcite of foraminifera shells and fine-grained matrix, (ii) authigenic quartz filling the chambers of some foraminifera, composing tests of siliceous algae (supposed), and very limited detrital quartz, (iii) phosphate in pellets, intraclasts, bone, teeth, and coprolites of carbonate fluorapatite, clay minerals thought to be detrital in origin, (iv) pyrite as filling the chambers of shells and voids.