intracranial

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intracranial

[¦in·trə′krā·nē·əl]
(anatomy)
Within the cranium.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pathogenesis of intracranial abscess requires inoculation of a microorganism into the brain parenchyma in an area of devitalized brain tissue or with poor microcirculation.
Intracranial abscesses frequently occur as a complication of sinusitis or neurosurgery, which are associated with high mortality (19-43%).
Children treated for complex or chronic neurological disease such as hydrocephalus, tumours and intracranial abscess often undergo serial imaging studies with multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT).
Role of CT scan in diagnosis and management of otogenic intracranial abscess. Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2011;63(3):274-8.
CT scanning is a sensitive method for revealing intracranial blood, mass effect, hydrocephalus, infarct, and intracranial abscess formation.
While CT is the standard modality for diagnosing sinusitis, MRI is more accurate in detecting intracranial abscesses. (3) An intracranial abscess is usually hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images.
0-64 65-74 75-84 85+ Vascular lesions Aneurysms 552 96 4 - - Arteriovenous malformations 102 96 2 1 - Primary intracerebral haemorrhage 89 85 10 4 - Intracranial tumours (a) Benign Meningiomas 142 65 23 11 1.5 Schwannomas 70 79 20 1.5 - Pituitary tumours 104 88 10 2 - (b) Malignant Gliomas 543 77 18 3 0.5 Metastases 178 75 22 3 0.5 Spinal tumours Extradural 225 63 24 12 1 Intradural 108 79 15 6 1 Intracranial abscess 54 94 6 - - Trauma Extradural haemoorhage 71 93 6 1 - Depressed skull fracture 111 99 - 1 - Chronic subdural haematoma 109 36 25 36 4 Spinal degenerative disease Cervical spondylotic myelopathy 174 51 27 21 1 Lumbar canal stenosis 145 59 31 9 - Lumbar disc protrusions 550 97 2 1 - Table II.
Streptococcus pneumoniae intracranial abscess is a rare complication of pneumococcal meningitis, with the majority of cases being reported in the preantibiotic era.
This case highlights the importance of considering intracranial abscess in the presence of red flags (fever, toxic appearance, and systemic symptoms) to prevent possible debilitating or fatal sequelae.
METHODS AND MATERIAL: This study comprised all patients of intracranial abscess admitted in various departments of Gandhi Medical College* Bhopal during June 2010 to May 2012 (Retrospectively) and June 2012 to 2014 (Prospectively).
For patients with central nervous system infections (including intracranial abscess and meningitis), the symptoms are highly dependent on the site of infection.