intracrystalline

intracrystalline

[¦in·trə′krist·əl·ən]
(metallurgy)
References in periodicals archive ?
The BJH average pore diameter (4.40-4.70 nm) indicates the creation of intracrystalline mesopores.
Choy, "Intracrystalline structure and physicochemical properties of mixed Si[O.sub.2]-Ti[O.sub.2] sol-pillared aluminosilicate," The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol.
The zeolites are crystalline inorganic materials with three dimensionally porous structure and their intracrystalline porosity is characterized by small pore sizes in the range 3-10 [Angstrom].
To reduce the possibility of homogenization of Ar isotopes during traditional incremental heating of muscovite and to reduce any core-rim effect (i.e., intracrystalline age discordance), standard single-grain, laser fusion [sup.40]Ar/[sup.39]Ar ages were used (e.g., Hames et al.
Mainly inter- and intracrystalline fissures several mm long with widths ranging from 40 to 100 pm were observed near the granite surface in areas bearing white crust.
Relative influences of solution composition and presence of intracrystalline proteins on magnesium incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals: insight into the vital effects.
The significance of a geochemically isolated intracrystalline organic fraction within biominerals.
The high removal efficiency for both organic (COD) and inorganic (Fe) pollutants exhibited by the zeolite may be attributed to its high purity, uniform and well compartmentalized intracrystalline pores resulting from its high surface area and micropore volumes.
The TEM microphotographs in Figure 3 show the distribution of intracrystalline precipitates when the specimens were aged at 175[degrees]C for 12 h, 18 h with and without LEDPC, respectively.
In addition, evidence of brittle and ductile shear zones and intracrystalline deformation is commonly found in these rocks.