carcinoma in situ

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carcinoma in situ

[‚kärs·ən′ō·mə in ′si·chü]
(medicine)
A malignant tumor in the premetastatic stage, when cells are at the site of origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diagnosis of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma based on morphologic and immunohistochemical features: a reproducibility study.
Intraepithelial carcinoma of the fimbria and pelvic serous carcinoma: evidence for a causal relationship.
As has previously been noted for TP53, the presence of somatic mutations within FBXW7, PIK3CA, and PPP2R1A in serous intraepithelial carcinoma and concurrent serous endometrial carcinomas implicates mutation of these genes as early events in the development of serous endometrial cancer (16).
71-73) In addition, p53 mutation appears to be an early event in serous carcinogenesis, as identical p53 mutations have been detected in a series of serous EACs and concurrent serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinomas.
227-231) The p53 signature lesion, a serous cancer precursor in the fimbria, is identified by its reactivity with p53 and lack of Ki-67 proliferative activity and cytologic atypia of intraepithelial carcinoma.
Although most of these occult carcinomas involve the tubal fimbriae, and are tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (TICs), (2-4) other sites, such as the midportion of the isthmus, are also involved.
In 1961, Abell and Gosling [55] described 2 distinct histopathologic types as intraepithelial carcinoma of Bowen's type and intraepithelial carcinoma simplex type.
In contrast to type I tumors, type II tumors are rarely associated with morphologically recognizable precursor lesions; however, type II tumors may arise from "dysplasia" in inclusion cysts or serous intraepithelial carcinoma in the fallopian tubes.
18) The spectrum of mucinous cystic neoplasms involving the renal pelvicalyceal system is similar to the more common ovarian mucinous neoplasms and includes benign mucinous cystadenoma, mucinous borderline tumor with or without intraepithelial carcinoma, and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.
To emphasize practical aspects of endometrial specimen handling and reporting, with selected comments on common diagnostic pitfalls, including (1) the diagnosis of endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma in atrophic endometrial biopsy specimens, (2) evaluation of adequacy of endometrial sampling specimens, (3) problems in diagnosing and measuring the depth of myometrial invasion in endometrial carcinoma, (4) the question of metastasis versus independent primaries in concurrent carcinomas of endometrium and one or both ovaries, (5) the problematic differential diagnoses between type 1 (primarily endometrioid) and type 2 (primarily serous) adenocarcinomas, and (6) atypical hyperplasia and proposed classification systems for its replacement.
To avoid confusion with the term carcinoma in situ as it applies to pTis in the TNM staging (see note F), the term intraepithelial carcinoma should be used to refer to histologically malignant epithelium that does not penetrate the basement membrane (ie, shows no evidence of stromal [lamina propria] invasion).
Because of the emphasis placed on hyperplasias in the conventional classification of intraductal proliferative lesions, the role of this lesion in mammary carcinogenesis was totally ignored by many pathologists in the United States until its neoplastic nature and similarity to low-grade invasive and intraepithelial carcinomas at the molecular level was demonstrated in our laboratory in 2000.