intransitive


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

transitive and intransitive verbs

English verbs are split into two major categories depending on how they function in a sentence: transitive and intransitive. Transitive verbs take one or more objects in a sentence, while intransitive verbs take no objects in a sentence.
Put simply, a transitive verb describes an action that is happening to something or someone, which is known as the verb’s direct object.
An intransitive verb, on the other hand, describes an action that does not happen to something or someone.
Continue reading...

intransitive

Logic Maths (of a relation) having the property that if it holds between one argument and a second, and between the second and a third, it must fail to hold between the first and the third
References in periodicals archive ?
61) be-PRS.3SG 'There is no brideal ransom, but there is money, he said' Another possibility to convey possessive relations in Obdorsk is to use a syntactically intransitive construction with the verb xajti 'remain':
As a general conclusion we might claim that when the location argument is realized as subject it seems to codify states, as in the case of the intransitive locative alternations described in section 4.2.
the intransitive verbs which appear in the clauses whose subjects undergo changes.
COCs take cognate objects that are morphologically related to the verbs and usually the verbs are intransitive. (Ogata 2011: 1) Those nouns that share, in turn, with the verb only a semantic relationship, like polka and grin in (8) and (9), seem to exhibit a syntactico-semantic behaviour of their own in relation to passivization, topicalization, pronominalization, definiteness and questionability, which is similar to the behaviour displayed by regular objects and which morphological cognates, however, do not show.
The intransitive paradigm is relatively simple, distinguishing only two numbers:
But for Leontes it is intransitive: at the moment when he speaks this line, this magic is his own, and it has no objective but himself.
The subjects of intransitive verbs always take Nominative or Dative case.