intransitive

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Related to intransitively: intransitive verb, ethnographic

transitive and intransitive verbs

English verbs are split into two major categories depending on how they function in a sentence: transitive and intransitive. Transitive verbs take one or more objects in a sentence, while intransitive verbs take no objects in a sentence.
Put simply, a transitive verb describes an action that is happening to something or someone, which is known as the verb’s direct object.
An intransitive verb, on the other hand, describes an action that does not happen to something or someone.
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intransitive

Logic Maths (of a relation) having the property that if it holds between one argument and a second, and between the second and a third, it must fail to hold between the first and the third
References in periodicals archive ?
Since K acts intransitively on [PHI], the problem is reduced to l instances of the intransitive case of finding C(K [y.sub.1]x, [PHI]),..., C(K [y.sub.]x, [PHI]).
The verb marrija in Yukulta which means 'listen, hear' if it is used transitively and, 'think, feel' if it is used intransitively. The word for pina 'ear' in Walmajarri and its derived forms pinajarti (lit.
First, it is difficult to generate scenarios that intuitively seem to be intransitively ranked.
(7) The Gothic uses its necessary anchoring in earth and earthliness not to proceed along earth's plane or to aspire to a known object and then return to earth, but in order to aspire, as it were, intransitively (and with due humility), in a recognition of the existential dependence of all creatures upon God.
(You can't retaliate intransitively. Or aimlessly either.) It's also obvious that the revenge-seeker must take the target to be a thing which acted for reasons: you can't seek revenge on a rock unless, bizarrely, you happen to think that the rock in question has acted in a harmful way towards you.
In traditional grammar terms, some verbs in English can be used either transitively or intransitively, as in the sentences "the river flooded the fields" or "the fields flooded"; "Jim opened the door" or "the door opened." But even in their intransitive sense, verbs are understood to have underlying or implicit agents, because of the EVENTS ARE ACTIONS metaphor.
Until recently the verb 'to theorize' was most commonly used intransitively. Now 'theorizing' often gets done to something, as when theatre history has its 'methodological [and] ...
If the novel registers intransitively, seems like Kohler's tunnel to be built for no purpose, then, by the end of the novel the reader would certainly have gravitated to the Party of Disappointed People.
Insofar as there is a standard usage, it is as a transitive verb, but Faulkner employs it intransitively, thereby eliding the verb's object and thus the event or action being interrupted.
These suggest the springtime of Ashbery with its bedazzlement, stars, mountains while the use of a transitive verb ("discovers") intransitively suggests a kind of otherworldliness.