analgesia

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Related to intrathecal analgesia: spinal analgesia

analgesia

, analgia
1. inability to feel pain
2. the relief of pain
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

analgesia

[‚an·əl′jēzh·ə]
(physiology)
Insensibility to pain with no loss of consciousness.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To our knowledge, our report is the first large-volume single-institution review of patients undergoing intrathecal analgesia in the setting of an established colorectal surgery ERP and the first within ERP to specifically examine the effect of various intrathecal-dosing regimens.
Intrathecal analgesia within an ERP is performed to provide an additional pain control mechanism within a multimodal pathway that also includes acetaminophen (paracetamol) and NSAIDs.
Women who received intrathecal analgesia also had a shorter time to vaginal delivery (398 vs.
Labels indicating intrathecal analgesia group or systemic analgesia group were sealed in opaque, numbered envelopes.
In the intrathecal analgesia group, general anaesthesia was maintained with intravenous midazolam 0.04 mg/kg/hour (or 0.02 mg/kg/hour for patients above 50 years age) with volume controlled ventilation with 50% oxygen in air mixture, on a low-cost electric-piston driven ventilator (Sur Ventilator Mark V, Sur Electrical Co.
The role of intrathecal analgesia or early epidurals in contributing to cesarean increase has yet to be studied in a controlled trial, though when early epidurals are studied as a separate stratum from within the Cochrane meta-analysis of epidural vs narcotic, (3) epidural given early (<4 cm) increase the cesarean section rate by an odds ratio of 2.59 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-5.23).
This data has been used to conduct a power analysis for a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing epidural and intrathecal analgesia following open abdominal surgery.
The use of this form of intrathecal analgesia merits further study.
Providing adequate pain relief can be problematic, especially in areas where choices are dictated by personnel or facility limitations.[1] Injection of small doses of opiates into the dural space (intrathecal analgesia) can provide effective pain relief for first stage labor.[2,4] Because this procedure has a low incidence of serious side effects and is an easy technique to learn, it is being used by physicians in a wide variety of practice situations, particularly in areas where limited nursing or physician services make continuous epidural anesthesia impractical (Table 1).
Intrathecal analgesia is effective, easy to perform, and avoids some side effects associated with other methods of obstetrical pain management, such as parenteral narcotics and epidural anesthesia.