catheter

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Related to intravenous catheter: central venous catheter

catheter

Med a long slender flexible tube for inserting into a natural bodily cavity or passage for introducing or withdrawing fluid, such as urine or blood
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

catheter

[′kath·ə·dər]
(medicine)
A hollow, tubular device for insertion into a cavity, duct, or vessel to permit injection or withdrawal of fluids or to establish patency of the passageway.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention emphasizes that there is no need to change peripheral intravenous catheters in adults more often than 7296 hours unless there is a risk of phlebitis.2571617 Even though studies have reported an association between phlebitis development and PVC duration there are no clear guidelines for an optimal or maximum indwell time.
Routine care of peripheral intravenous catheters versus clinically indicated replacement: Randomized controlled trial.
Intravenous catheter diameter, which has emerged as an important variable in other studies (5), was not analyzed in this study.
For example, bloodstream infections (BSI) stemming from central or peripheral intravenous catheters can be the result of poor protocol compliance during placement or improper ongoing catheter maintenance while the patient is in the care of the perioperative team.
The global intravenous access devices market segmentation is based on product types (intravenous needles, intravenous catheters, midline peripheral catheters, central catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, centrally inserted central catheters, intravenous infusion pumps, insulin infusion pumps, parenteral feeding infusion pumps, patient controlled analgesia infusion pumps, syringe infusion pumps).
Complications of percutaneously inserted intravenous catheters previously reported in literature include bacteremia, mechanical failure or rupture and venous thrombosis.
Today the insertion of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) is a common practice in hospitals, resulting in local or systemic complications.
In response to requests from clinicians throughout the United States, Canada and Europe, the SecurAcath is available to secure 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 French (F) size intravenous catheters. Interrad markets the SecurAcath as the only catheter securement device that does not require sutures or adhesives, which, according to the company, enables fast, safe, and continuous securement.
Blood samples, injections, and intravenous catheters are a part of the reality of young people with end stage renal disease.
Smiths Medical gains intravenous catheters absent from its existing safety-engineered devices line-up via the purchase of privately held Medex for $925 million in cash and debt, according to The Gray Sheet.