intrinsic luminosity

intrinsic luminosity

[in′trin·sik ‚lü·mə′näs·əd·ē]
(astrophysics)
The total amount of radiation emitted by a star over a specified range of wavelengths.
References in periodicals archive ?
The faintness of this low-mass star, which has only about one-fortieth the intrinsic luminosity of the sun, made it difficult to analyze.
Because these supernovas have roughly the same intrinsic luminosity, their apparent brightness indicates their distance from Earth.
Previous studies have suggested that this type, known as a supernova la, has the same intrinsic luminosity in both nearby and distant galaxies.
Objects such as these, termed standard candles because they could be thought of as light sources whose luminosities were very well regulated, were a valuable tool for estimating the distances of astronomical objects because their observed brightnesses could be thought of as depending purely upon their distance, rather than any variability in their intrinsic luminosity.
Matching the inferred rate of star formation to both the rate and spectra of observed gamma-ray bursts, and assuming that gamma-ray bursts all have about the same intrinsic luminosity, Ralph A.
They all have the same intrinsic luminosity, like light bulbs of a single wattage.