intumescence


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

intumescence

[‚in·tü′mes·əns]
(materials)
The property of a material to swell when heated; intumescent materials in bulk and sheet form are used as fireproofing agents.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

intumescence

The process of swelling up, as with the application of heat, such as vermiculite that is heat-treated for use in thermal insulation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Trossarelli, "Study of the mechanism of intumescence in fire retardant polymers: part V-mechanism of formation of gaseous products in the thermal degradation of ammonium polyphosphate," Polymer Degradation and Stability, vol.
Between 300 and 500[degrees]C, MEL decomposed and the development of intumescence occurred at the same time.
The measurements were done in the ventral horn of lumbar intumescence (caudal to the injury site), where the lumbar CPG is located and the spinal cord showed a preserved morphology.
impart intumescence, bum rate control, anticorrosion, quaternization sites, disassociation rate/electron transfer control, etc.
These results showed that the intumescence and fire protection of the coating without BN attenuated fast under aging conditions, which implied that the anti-aging property of the coating without BN was very weak.
Amoureux, "Synergistic effect of zeolite in an intumescence process: study of the carbonaceous structures using solid-state NMR," Journal of the Chemical Society: Faraday Transactions, vol.
These are called the cervical and lumbar intumescence.
These reviews have suggested that clinicians and surgeons should include the presence of this muscle in the differential diagnosis for softtissue intumescence on the posteromedial face of the ankle region (Ger & Sedlin, 1976; del Sol et al., 1989; Travis & Pitcher, 1995; John & Borrelli; Dos Remedios & Joly; Kendi et al.).
Based on proprietary phosphorus compounds, the masterbatches achieve their flame-retardant property through intumescence. When exposed to fire, the flame-retarded thermoplastic material foams and crosslinks, forming a stable char at the surface, Clariant explains.
Now EG is a new kind of physical intumescence flame retardant, and it is not only of high efficiency but also friendly to environment.
Fream, Eliokem and a French lab that specializes in fire protection materials, have been investigating the resin's role in the mechanism of intumescence.