invariable

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invariable

a mathematical quantity having an unchanging value; a constant
References in periodicals archive ?
To be normal, statistically or otherwise, involves occupying a discursive category whose invariability depends on the constant negation of even potential variability.
I suggest that two characteristics define a factor: invariability and the earning of a return.
Since things in the visible world are ultimately copies of the forms, they embody natures and shapes that make them what they are, natures and shapes that can be abstracted and made accessible to scientific and mathematical reasoning because of their intelligibility, invariability, and constancy.
This means that it implies an invariability in the social structure that does not exist in reality and that, lacking an awareness of this, it absolutizes the observer's present social conditions.
Spear concluded that there is a general consensus about the invariability of the sensitivity to the low spatial frequency band in the normal aging process.
This system ensures that we have an extremely stable temperature, allowing for consistent brewing and final product invariability.
However, the possible explanation could be the fact that the exchange rate has been tightly fixed, so that the variable, contrary to the case of the Visegrad countries, suffered complete invariability.
Too theoretical, too esthetician, too literally, too demanding and inflexible is Ierunca Virgil and Marino rejects, when he receives exactly what himself asks, blaming the author's invariability.
A commitment to civility does not change the tough issues we face, the hard choices that must be made, or the invariability of differences of opinions.
Noting the variety of results arising from these approaches, then, Golemovic observes that "[i]n view of the above, as the most important features of the refrain, the ones which constitute its essential quality, we may underscore the invariability of its (1) form, (2) content, and (3) position within the song.
Cabet, like Mentor, prescribes invariability in dress, uniformity in furniture, simultaneity of exercises, community of meals, etc.
Hirschler understands the latter as follows: "the historical field surveyed was static, homogeneous and constantly reiterating its invariability.