false light

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false light

[¦fȯls ′līt]
(navigation)
A light which is unavoidably exhibited by an aid to navigation and which is not intended to be a part of the proper characteristic of the light, such as reflections from storm panes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the underlying claims were not based on invasion of privacy because the plaintiff had expressly sought recovery for only the economic injury of allegedly having lost cell phone messaging allowances.
This bill provides additional protections for homeowners, giving them the ability to sue a neighbor for invasion of privacy if the neighbor secretly records recreational activities in their backyard.
The second form of common-law invasion of privacy is publication of private facts.
Lewis said Buckley was still charged with the crime of invasion of privacy, regardless of the Washington County judge's ruling.
He warned: "The variation or discharge of an injunction does not affect the right any one may have to pursue a claim for damages for invasion of privacy or defamation.
Ravi was charged last month with bias intimidation, invasion of privacy, witness- and evidence-tampering and other offences.
Installing these cameras is an invasion of privacy and is most likely to cause many problems," said Member of Parliament Abdul-Rahman al-Anad.
John Rimmer, Merseyside executive member for teaching union, NAS/UWT said: "We are opposed to this harassment, and the plan to use telephone contact in this way is an invasion of privacy.
The motorists were not given any form of of- ficial identification from the census takers, they were not informed of any data protection procedures and were then asked to give personal details about their movements which I regard an invasion of privacy.
Barrell's concern is with the 'cultural effects of that repression, the atmosphere of suspicion it created', the politicisation of anything and everything and the invasion of privacy to which it led.
Critics of the system claim it is an invasion of privacy, however Avis promises not to store the print permanently and will not use it in any way unless a crime is perpetrated.
The company says it is prepared for criticisms of an invasion of privacy but claims it is a last resort to combat crime.