Invasiveness


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Invasiveness

 

the ability of agents of infection (viruses, bacteria, protozoans) to penetrate the body of a plant, animal, or person and to spread within it by overcoming the body ’s defenses through the manufacture of toxins and enzymes (chiefly hyaluronidase).

Invasiveness is characteristic of a species and, within a species, of various strains of the microorganism. The degree and speed of the spread of microorganisms from the initial site of entry to particular organs and tissues are defined as the invasiveness of the given strain of causative agent. The invasiveness depends on the age of the culture and may be increased by the repeated inoculation (passage) of susceptible animals.

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Pouliquen and the team's detailed and interesting study of the four preclinical models and its data may aid the cancer research community to catalyse further investigations on invasiveness.
In conclusion, our results are in agreement with previous results that point to PTTG expression as a useful molecular marker for pituitary tumor invasiveness, particularly for NFPA.
Venous malformation with deeper invasiveness (in the muscular layer) showed higher expression levels of Gal-3 than those with superficial invasiveness (in the eyelid, skin, and fat).
For the estimation of postoperative outcome, it is important to have a clear picture about the magnitude and invasiveness of the involved surgery as an essential factor in addition to 2 conditions: the pre-existing health condition of the patient and the type and quality of anaesthesiological care.
Fusion length, operative approach, revision status, and performance of osteotomy were used to generate a Surgical Invasiveness Index for use when sampling AHRQ generated datasets.
For woody ornamental species, for example, being invasive elsewhere was the single best predictor of potential invasiveness in a new region of introduction (Reichard and Hamilton 1997).
Osteosarcoma has high invasiveness and metastasis into the
It was hypothesized that the nature of sexual abuse (invasiveness, continuity, and severity) would be associated with the place and circumstance in which the abuse occurred, the characteristics of the perpetrator (age, relationship with the victim, abuse of other children, and number of perpetrators) and the characteristics of the victim (gender, age at abuse onset, re-victimization and the later transformation of victim into perpetrator).
In letters to EPA, USDA and the departments of Defense, Energy and Transportation, the scientists note that California, Colorado, Nevada and Texas have put giant reed, a native plant of India, on noxious weed lists, and Alabama, New Mexico and South Carolina either list it as invasive or at high risk for invasiveness. The scientists say past government actions allowed invasive plants such as the kudzu vine in the South to quickly spread and overtake ecosystems.
He describes how gene mutations are not powerful enough to cause cancer; how cancer is initiated and why progression takes years or decades; and the global or macroscopic characteristics that identify cancer: anaplasia, autonomous growth, metastasis, abnormal cell morphology, DNA indices from 0.5 to over 2, genetic instability, and the high level of membrane-bound and secreted proteins responsible for invasiveness and loss of contact inhibition.
Late last year, President Obama signed the Calm Act, a law capping commercial volume to prevent such invasiveness in ad sound.
In response to Patrick's accusations, a Dewhurst spokesman said the lieutenant governor is "concerned about the invasiveness of airport security screening procedures."