Invective


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Invective

 

a harsh denunciation or satirical mockery of a real individual or group of individuals, usually accompanied by some displacement in the reality of the portrayal. Invective is characterized by a two-dimensional quality of structure and meaning, which often emphasizes personal accusations for the purpose of public denigration.

The literary forms of invective are varied and include epigrams (by Martial) and polemical articles and speeches (Cicero’s Philippics). Invective was employed by Aristophanes in the comedies Knights and Clouds, by Catullus in his lyrics, by Erasmus in Praise of Folly, and by Diderot in Rameau’s Nephew. The term “invective” is rarely used.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rather, these plays do not really participate in the type of back-and-forth dialogue between opposing texts and plays seen in the other chapters in Railing, Reviling, and Invective.
10) William Fitzgerald's groundbreaking study (1988) argued for the interrelation between the political, invective, and erotic poems of the Epodes, and has laid the foundation for much later criticism focused on the sociopolitical context of the Epodes' production and on Roman sexuality.
It seems indeed that the development of the invective is accompanied by an escalation in its bitterness: "[Bruni] acted as a transitional figure in the development of the genre from a sober, restrained accusatory or defensive oration to a merciless, vicious catalogue of crimes, real and imaginary" (39).
This blame was replete with racist invective which has included calling Middle Easterners "ragheads" and suggesting that the U.
Ann Coulter spewed invective and received crowd adoration.
Contextualizing early Christian "sex talk" in the larger framework of Greco-Roman invective, Knust convincingly argues that although Christian writers constantly accused pagans, Jews, and each other of sexual immorality, such polemic provides little evidence for actual practices.
Equal parts classic SOIA-style hardcore brutality and political invective aimed directly at the Bush Administration's--in Koller's estimation--lack of integrity, the new record finds the group achieving its most frenetic release since Scratch the Surface.
The way you build long-term is to succeed short-term," Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) chair Rahm Emanuel shot back, after a contentious meeting in which, the Post reported, Emanuel left Dean's office spewing invective.
The "brights" will naturally devour it; but honest, thoughtful believers have nothing to fear from it (no invective or cheap shots here).
Early Renaissance Invective and the Controversies of Antonia da Rho David Rutherford Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies Arizona State University, PO Box 874402, Tempe, AZ 85287-4402 0866983457 $48.
Williams reports that Gaffney, writing for Fox News' website, argued that al-Jazeera must be taken off the air "one way or another" and that it was "imperative that enemy media be taken down" Gaffney implored his readers to remember Bush's invective that "you are either with us or with the terrorists"